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Horner sees F1 at a "crossroads" as manufactures enter Formula E

  • Published on 09 Aug 2017 11:11
  • comments 9
  • By: Fergal Walsh

Christian Horner believes that Formula 1 is at a crossroads when it comes to engine regulations for the future. In recent months, manufacturers such as Mercedes and Porsche have taken up the option to enter Formula E, leaving behind the DTM and LMP1 contests respectively.

There has also been a number of meetings to determine what the new rules will be. Fans have been highly critical of the 'power unit' era, and the new rules look to simplify the hybrid power while also making the engines cheaper and louder.

"I hope we do not end up with a bad compromise," Horner told Auto Motor und Sport. "The manufacturers are all going to Formula E, which is their playground for future technologies. Porsche, Mercedes, Renault, Audi, Jaguar -- that's already more than Formula 1 ever had.

"The cost of Formula E is 5 per cent of an F1 budget, so what I can imagine is that the mass scale manufacturers go there and the sports car manufacturers like Ferrari, Aston Martin and Lamborghini are in F1. That's their place. So I see formula one at a crossroads.

"If you believe the politics, we'll all be driving electric cars in 2030, so Formula 1 should be the counterpoint - pure racing, man and machine, a competition of the best drivers in the world with combustion engines," he added.

Back in June Ross Brawn also stated that F1 is at a crossroad, and Horner has called on the Brit needs to show courage to make the right decision for the future of F1. Despite indicating that the fans wish for a return to V10 or V12 engines, he knows that it is not possible.

"And I did my own survey at one of the fan forums, and everyone cheered when I said do we want to go back to the V10s," Horner stated. "I doubt we are going to do that We'll have to be content with the bi-turbo V6. But the sound is the key. Of all the criticism of the current engines, the most important thing for the fans is the sound."

 

Fergal Walsh

Replies (9)

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  • Electric vehicles may do good things for F1..

    • + 0
    • Aug 9 2017 - 12:28
  • Hombibi

    Posts: 137

    Only if you are at the race Mr Horner. 99.5% watch the race from a television set. On a good channel you switch of the commentary and turn op the volume as you like. Get a decent sound system, some equalizers and anyone can make F1 sound as they want. It is not about noise. Maybe this is proven by Formula E: it makes hardly any noise and has a fast rising popularity.

    If you want F1 to remain relevant than release the rules. Build the future on wide and varied innovation. let active suspension and other technological development drive the sport. Formula E is taking over that role currently and eventually that will render F1 pointless. And why would you want to prevent F1 from using electric engines if that is the future? Let the teams decide what they build and drive.

    Than cut back on aerodynamics ("down force") and gimmicks ("DRS"). The first because it dominates a format wherein a fastest time set in clean air determines start position and with that the race outcome. These "qualification cars" can not follow other cars well. Therefore the guy driving in front of the rest of the field has an unnecessary advantage. Cut back on gimmicks that obfuscate real racing capabilities of driver and cars, who on earth ever thought DRS was a good idea?

    Furthermore, bring back competing on the circuit: level the performance differences with a weight handicap system. It is the easiest and most effective tool to control performance differences, and it provides many opportunities to stimulate innovation and competition: Constructor points for high handicaps, reduced handicaps for new technologies, handicap increase on race result and/or qualification etc etc.

    • + 0
    • Aug 9 2017 - 13:03
  • No, the most important thing for us is in fact not the sound. How about reliability and costs? Both are important to make sure most teams are competitive and can survive in this sport.

    • + 0
    • Aug 9 2017 - 13:57
  • reg

    Posts: 162

    Perhaps F1 need to manipulate the results even more than they do at present with skewed financial payouts to favourite teams, maybe by having FAN POWER like Formula E?

    • + 0
    • Aug 9 2017 - 17:58
  • kngrthr

    Posts: 203

    no. no. no.

    do not handicap any one ever.

    it goes against what sport is about.

    some football teams are heaps better than others. so we take two players off the field ?

    • + 0
    • Aug 10 2017 - 13:46
    • Hombibi

      Posts: 137

      The handicap system is to reduce the impact of differences in equipment that other teams have no access too. It is used for decades succesfully in motorracing, sailing, etc.
      The other solution is onedesign: everyone the same equipment.

      Football is onedesign: equipment plays no significant role and is not a differentiator.

      • + 0
      • Aug 10 2017 - 17:57
    • Very few series nail the handicap system. Super GT pretty much did it, but Im not sure if it would work for F1.

      • + 0
      • Aug 10 2017 - 19:48
  • Hombibi

    Posts: 137

    @KNGRTHR Any sport where the equipment differs vastly between teams amd has a large impact on the competition outcome needs a handicap system. Or onedesign. Sailing does it successfully for decades already, lifeboat rowing/racing would be another one. And it is not strange to motorsport either.

    Soccer is essentially onedesign: equipment plays no significant role in the competition.

    • + 0
    • Aug 10 2017 - 17:50
    • Hombibi

      Posts: 137

      Apologies, useless double post.

      • + 0
      • Aug 11 2017 - 08:21

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