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Ricciardo excluded from qualifying classifications

  • Published on 21 Sep 2019 21:44
  • comments 7
  • By: Richard Fletcher

Daniel Ricciardo has been disqualified from eighth place after his car was found to have breached the rules concerning the MGU-K. He has been given permission to start from the back of the grid.

During qualifying, it was found that Ricciardo's Renault had delivered more energy than is permitted although the team argued that the increase was very small and that there was no benefit.

Renault also stated that the fluctuation in power output occurred during the second-fastest lap of Q1 which did not give them an advantage over their competitors. 

The stewards explained that the competitor exceeded the MGU-K power flow limit and this was not disputed by Renault. They added that it is not a defence that no performance advantage was gained.

"If an automobile is found not to comply with the applicable technical regulations, it shall be no defence to claim that no performance advantage was obtained."

Riccardo had been very positive during the post-qualifying interviews and expressed how pleased he was with the progress that the team had made.

He had been expecting top ten finishes for the next 6 races: "Consistency is something we expect now, the last three weekends we have been well inside the top ten on all different style circuits. and to back it up with both cars in Q3.

"Soon we are going to come across different circuits, Russia, who knows? I think we can be confident that unless we really make a mistake somewhere we should be a Q3 car from here on out."

 

 

 

Replies (7)

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  • RogerF1

    Posts: 414

    Again a “shoot yourself in the foot” from F1. From their own report, DR caught a kerb and the MGU-K over revved and gave him a ONE MILLISECOND advantage!,!!!! - which didn’t even affect his quali position. So he gets dumped to the back of the grid or pit lane - to be decided. This element of technically ‘splitting hairs’ is where the sport goes so wrong IMO. T.echno babble has overtaken the racing element of the whole show so that money wins not drivers. Make it powerful but simple and let the drivers do the rest.

    • + 1
    • Sep 22 2019 - 00:23
  • They gotta try what they can to beat McLaren now, don't they? See that kinda gets into a similar situation with VERs wheel spin/power loss with FIA control kicking in, because it's verging on traction control, that they're trying to control, innit? I kind of like that at least the rules they're getting to kind of make sense. The suggestion to get rid of sensors so the engineers can't convey real-time metrics to the driver isn't a bad idea. Puts things more into the driver's skill and less on radio feedback.

    • + 0
    • Sep 22 2019 - 04:42
  • I can't believe this has happened - the stewards are allowing more aggressive racing *good) but have crappy little rulings like this - question - did it actually make a difference to Renault's qualifying - did it detriment anyone else? I don't think it did - so why not fit the fine to the crime and let this one lie - stupid.

    • + 1
    • Sep 22 2019 - 07:58
    • I think all the stupid lie on Renault for this. Who on earth are willing to risk a penalty by using a boost that won't help you?

      • + 1
      • Sep 22 2019 - 10:22
    • "crappy little rulings" ... what do you think the "formula" in Formula 1 is for?
      If the technical spec says "don't exceed 120 kW" then the electronics should be designed by the manufacturer to not ever exceed that. I disagree with the rule actually, since it amounts to a limit on horsepower, but in this case they probably had to put in something to prevent Formula 1 from becoming Formula E.
      But once the technical rule is in place, it should get enforced.

      • + 0
      • Sep 22 2019 - 10:37
  • Silly Renault. If it won't give you a benefit, don't do it! I mean, the statement is baffling. If it won't help you, why breach the regulations?!

    • + 1
    • Sep 22 2019 - 10:16
    • More likely they thought they had effective limiting in place in some indirect kind of way and simply never foresaw this scenario. Comparisons to Verstappen's wheel-spin / traction control detection woes in Monza seem justified.

      • + 0
      • Sep 22 2019 - 10:39
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