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Ferrari not ruling out using 'veto' for future engine rules

  • Published on 02 Nov 2017 10:48
  • comments 19
  • By: Rob Veenstra

Ferrari is not ruling out using its controversial 'veto' to block Liberty Media's plans for the future of F1. Already, it is believed manufacturers Mercedes, Ferrari and Renault are opposing the new F1 owner's plans to make substantial changes to the engine rules for 2021.

Red Bull team boss Christian Horner has accused the two top teams in particular of simply "blocking" the obvious need for serious engine changes. "In some way or the other, we are always blocking Red Bull in the mind of Christian," said Ferrari team boss Maurizio Arrivabene.

The Italian insists Ferrari and Mercedes actually have every right to express strong opinions about the engines, because "it's our business". "It's not a question of Mercedes or Ferrari blocking here or blocking there," he said.

Arrivabene said Ferrari wants to "keep the same engine architecture" for 2021, reduce costs, improve performance and boost the show. "Normally you have the simple equation: what and how?" he added. "For sure it's not Ferrari or Mercedes driving the show, but they are the people who are manufacturing the engines."

And so Arrivabene said Ferrari will not rule out wielding its unique and historic power of "veto" to stop changes it considers are wrong. "At a certain point we apply our right to do a veto for good reason at that time," he said. "But within serious people and people who have a clear idea, people who understand what they are talking about, I think you don't need any veto," the Italian added. (GMM)

Replies (19)

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  • DChemTech

    Posts: 39

    Is there some way for the public to veto Ferrari?

    • + 1
    • Nov 2 2017 - 11:44
    • No single team should have Veto powers. That being said, Ferrari should focus on by investing more into Electric future, less so on F1, which is in a limbo between a petrol and electric worlds.

      • + 0
      • Nov 2 2017 - 19:45
  • Harryw

    Posts: 105

    Id love to see ferrari kicked out of f1. Too much power, too selfish, too corrupt, too much money. For the sake of the sport they should have no veto and decisions made for good of all teams not just the elites

    • + 1
    • Nov 2 2017 - 12:00
  • FatMike

    Posts: 153

    of course they would. new regulations are not in the best interest of the current works engines.

    • + 0
    • Nov 2 2017 - 12:26
  • Barron

    Posts: 625

    They’re obviously not thinking of ‘the little guys’ that make up half the grid (non factory). It’s a nice little earner for them. I believe what they are most afraid of are engine rules that encourage more builders into the sport thus potentially losing them each $20-50 million a year. Ferrari & Merc have to be a little careful here as USA is their biggest market. They won’t want to upset the apple cart.

    • + 0
    • Nov 2 2017 - 13:30
  • samuelw

    Posts: 21

    ok so why didnt they veto the v8's to v6 change as they were protesting against v6 as this was going to cost mega monies..

    • + 0
    • Nov 2 2017 - 15:14
    • Perhaps, their priorities didnt align with those of Fans.

      • + 0
      • Nov 2 2017 - 19:46
    • Because they wanted the V6 turbo hybrids to happen.

      • + 0
      • Nov 3 2017 - 04:56
  • mbmwe36

    Posts: 533

    Wasn't expecting this from Ferrari at this time. I actually find the new set of regulations rather boring, as it is in many ways status quo. It is probably the focus on standardised parts that they're mad about, as there then is a real chance that mighty Ferrari might lose the championship to a cosworth (or other small manufacturer) powered car. It's probably easier to swallow to lose to mercedes than it would be to lose to a smaller manufacturer.
    With my very limited knowledge on the matter, I don't think these regulations are the way to go to make F1 a better product. But then again, how can you argue with Brawn?

    • + 0
    • Nov 2 2017 - 15:50
    • The way I see it, the new regulations will amend reliability and cut costs at the same time, two of the biggest problems the current regulations face. The simplicity is a nice bonus, but what we need is the other two. If you look at the current regulations, how much has they benefitted the sport? The only legit great season was IMO 2016, and even then Mercedes were stronger than ever. Other than that, we've had a significant increase in engine related retirements, and its proven quite detrimental to the sport. We dont want a sport which is decided by reliability rather than skill. And the new regulations is basically the only way F1 even has a chance of getting a new manufacturer into the grid, Honda's entry and Renault's struggles has scared away anyone from even considering trying the current regulations.

      • + 0
      • Nov 2 2017 - 18:36
    • mbmwe36

      Posts: 533

      Time will tell if it'll attract other manufacturers. The thing is, they are not solving the sound issue. Yes, there'll be more revs available, but they probably won't be used. I've seen some debate on whether or not the MGUH puts a damper on the sound - but either way, it will probably just amplify the mediocre sound at best, so not great.
      The push to pass is not something I'm excited about either, but I'll take it over DRS any day, because both the front and the rear car can use it.
      Is there any word on if refueling is being considered?

      • + 0
      • Nov 2 2017 - 20:24
    • Indeed, but it does look brighter compared to the current regulations in that sense. True, maybe not the sound, but then again how high of a priority is that compared to reliability, costs and simplicity? The sound will likely not get worse, we might have to settle with that for now. From the little I know, it shouldnt dampen much, I'd honestly be more concernced about the cooling rather than the MGU-H itself, but as I say, dont know too much about the stuff. Honestly, as DRS was this year, I like it. It hasnt been some magic all purpose overtaker, it has basically just given that extra oompf. If the push to pass can be something similar, that'd be great. As far as I know? No. And I sorta think thats for the best, since F1 isnt really an endurance race. I mean sure, you might need a little less fuel on board at a given time, but at the end of the day I dont think it would benefit the show.

      • + 0
      • Nov 3 2017 - 05:01
  • Slightly more simplified PU yes. Standard parts absolutely not. That's against the DNA of the sport.

    • + 2
    • Nov 2 2017 - 17:54
    • Standard parts is definitely a no go. That just doesnt work here.

      • + 0
      • Nov 2 2017 - 19:06
    • mbmwe36

      Posts: 533

      Agreed. It completely goes against everything F1 should be.

      • + 0
      • Nov 2 2017 - 20:26
    • Barron

      Posts: 625

      You might want to talk to Haas about that..

      • + 0
      • Nov 3 2017 - 10:19
    • Cookie cutter Engines doesn't work in F1. If forced, F1 might loose its charm to the biggest names.

      • + 0
      • Nov 3 2017 - 16:42
  • FIA should re-negotiate this veto (read, get rid of it) If that means Ferrari will leave F1, so be it. They can finally fire up the 637 and go drive in circles

    • + 1
    • Nov 3 2017 - 07:30
  • Freguz

    Posts: 160

    Veto sounds crazy, why is there a veto? Please Ferrari leave the grid now

    • + 1
    • Nov 3 2017 - 13:55

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