user icon

If refuelling is too expensive, we won't do it - Wolff

  • Published on 18 May 2015 13:44
  • comments 4
  • By: Rob Veenstra

Time will tell how much last Thursday's meeting of the Strategy Group will actually change the direction of formula one. The group - featuring the top teams, Bernie Ecclestone and the FIA - met in England amid ever-loudening voices calling for urgent measures to turn around flagging audiences, disinterested sponsors and struggling teams and promoters.

Afterwards, it announced that teams will be able to choose their own tyre compounds from next year -- but Pirelli immediately voiced its doubts and concerns. Also getting the green-light was faster and louder cars for 2017, with a six second per-lap boost to be achieved through aerodynamics, higher revs, fatter tyres and lighter cars due in part to the return of in-race refuelling.

"It was a good meeting," Mercedes team boss Toto Wolff told Germany's Bild am Sonntag newspaper. "We want to build the fastest cars in the world and now we will. That was the best moment: when everyone raised their hands to vote for building the fastest cars of all time."

However, before any of the changes can be set in stone, they will have to pass through the World Motor Sport Council, which will not meet until mid July in Mexico. Wolff acknowledged that reintroducing refuelling, for example, is in fact still being looked at.

"Refuelling was banned because of cost and because the pitstops were taking too long," he told the BBC. "But we want to re-explore it and see if we can make pitstops for fuel and tyres happen in the same time it takes to change the tyres now. (But) if it's too expensive, we won't do it."

The fact that the notoriously-divided teams are still in the discussion phase is causing some to wonder if the changes will in fact ever see the light of day. "Basically, nothing was decided," F1 legend Gerhard Berger told Germany's motorsport-magazin.com, "but this is not surprising. Everything will remain as it is," he predicted. (GMM)

Replies (4)

Login to reply
  • Anurag

    Posts: 7

    "But we want to re-explore it and see if we can make pitstops for fuel and tyres happen in the same time it takes to change the tyres now."

    How on earth are they going to do that?? Refuel a car in <3 seconds.. Not happening..

    • + 0
    • May 18 2015 - 14:43
    • There exists water only based metal cutters that have such force to deliver water at high rates in terms of force and volume. For F1 the same technology can be adapted with reduced force and increased flow rates. Obviously the mounting and refueling systems will change. It is all down to cost but the technology exists.

      • + 0
      • May 19 2015 - 05:03
    • scf1fan

      Posts: 58

      @Mclarenfan - That been done. No problem . . . until it becomes a problem! Then it can become a really big problem really fast!!! For what benefit? Add to that, that's 4 more people in every pit. Two to hold the main nozzle, and two more to hold the backup. Even the "gravity" flow units at Indy have issues when the valves stick.
      .
      I can't see why F1 doesn't think about limiting the number of people working on the car during the stop. It would be the same for all the teams, it would slow down the stops and probably make them a bit safer. It would also save some money! and it would increase the strategic value to stop. (Or not to stop!)

      • + 0
      • May 19 2015 - 21:05
    • @SCF1FAN - With the technology adaptation I am talking about it will need more people to hold and provide backup. The volumes of fuels being pumped in will require more stability assistance. Unless they have stationary mounted mechanism that they can simply guide in and refill the car but this poses problems in precision and timing when times are made and lost in the pitstops.

      The idea behind re-introduction of refueling it to add more variability in tyres and strategy. The teams don't want to slow down the pitstops hence the consideration for faster refueling. Refueling in it self has added dangers but my post is not about the danger but about viability and it is possible to have refueling in 3 seconds or under. Costs will now dictate if this will truly come back to F1. I am guessing it probably won't

      • + 0
      • May 20 2015 - 05:19

BE Grand Prix of Belgium

Local time 

BE Grand Prix of Belgium

Local time 

Related news

World Championship standings 2021

Show full world champion standings

Test calendar

Bahrain International Circuit - Winter testing

See full test schedule

Give your opinion!

Will Bottas challenge Hamilton for the world championship in 2020?

Team profile

Show full profile

Formula 1 Calendar - 2021

Date
Grand Prix
Circuit
-
Bahrain
26 - Mar 28
Bahrain
16 - Apr 18
Italy
7 - May 9
Spain
20 - May 23
Monaco
4 - Jun 6
Azerbaijan
18 - Jun 20
France
25 - Jun 27
Austria
2 - Jul 4
Austria
16 - Jul 18
United Kingdom
30 - Aug 1
Hungary
27 - Aug 29
Belgium
3 - Sep 5
Netherlands
10 - Sep 12
Italy
24 - Sep 26
Russian
1 - Oct 3
Singapore
8 - Oct 10
Japan
22 - Oct 24
United States of America
29 - Oct 31
Mexico
5 - Nov 7
Brazil
19 - Nov 21
Australia
3 - Dec 5
Saudi Arabia
10 - Dec 12
United Arab Emirates
See full schedule

Formula 1 Calendar - 2021

Date
Grand Prix & Circuit
26 - Mar 28
16 - Apr 18
7 - May 9
20 - May 23
Monaco Monte Carlo
4 - Jun 6
Azerbaijan Baku City Circuit
18 - Jun 20
France Paul Ricard
25 - Jun 27
Austria Red Bull Ring
2 - Jul 4
Austria Red Bull Ring
16 - Jul 18
United Kingdom Silverstone
30 - Aug 1
Hungary Hungaroring
27 - Aug 29
3 - Sep 5
Netherlands Circuit Zandvoort
10 - Sep 12
Italy Monza
24 - Sep 26
Russian Sochi Autodrom
1 - Oct 3
8 - Oct 10
22 - Oct 24
United States of America Circuit of the Americas
29 - Oct 31
5 - Nov 7
Brazil Interlagos
19 - Nov 21
Australia Albert Park
3 - Dec 5
Saudi Arabia Jeddah Street Circuit
10 - Dec 12
United Arab Emirates Yas Marina Circuit
See full schedule
show sidebar