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New engine rules to be based on 1.6 litre turbo V6

  • Published on 11 Dec 2015 10:30
  • comments 4
  • By: Rob Veenstra

If F1 is going to overhaul its engine regulations, it should base the new formula on the current 'power units'. That is the view of Mercedes and Renault's respective technical chiefs, arguing that installing a completely new set of rules would be too expensive.

With the earlier plan for 'parallel' regulations dead for now, the manufacturers have instead been tasked with coming up with a new, global solution for 2017 or 2018 that is louder, cheaper and more powerful. "To save money, you would need to base it on the 1.6 litre turbo V6," said Mercedes' Andy Cowell. "Each new design devours money, no matter how simple you make the new engine concept."

His Renault counterpart Remi Taffin agrees: "The cheapest way is to maintain as much as possible of the current architecture." The Frenchman also dismissed any notion that it is a straightforward matter to produce an affordable and simple engine that produces 1000 horse power. "At 1000hp, we are not talking about simple engines. You can't just buy them off the shelf," Taffin told Auto Motor und Sport.

He added: "If we increase the fuel flow rate and lift the rev limit, we could achieve 1000hp (now)." But Cowell says increasing the flow rate is not quite that simple, because "Everything will be hotter, must be cooled better and be more reliable. And that costs money." And he said that tearing up the current regulations and going for something entirely new also risks driving the field apart yet again.

"If we could continue with the current regulations, the differences between the (different) engines would perhaps be three tenths by 2018. Every new concept involves the risk that someone comes up with a much better idea. And that could mean a difference of seconds rather than tenths," said Cowell. (GMM)

Replies (4)

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  • denis1304

    Posts: 284

    Why limit electric power if you want to go green??
    tell them electric motor can weigh x amount kg, battery pack can weight amount kg and go nuts...

    • + 0
    • Dec 11 2015 - 12:15
    • That is the system we have today, so that'd not change anything.

      • + 0
      • Dec 11 2015 - 14:02
  • I think its stupid that everyone want to switch philosophy already from the hybrid one just because it hasnt worked the first two years. Come on, its almost always like this at first. What says next year will be equally bad? As I see it, the hybrid era isnt bad in itself, its just that certain rules has made it impossible for underpowered teams to catch up properly. Reduce restrictions on chassis (though perhaps still ban wind tunnels) and let people like Newey go nuts on it, they could win tenths just on that. And reduce what an engine is allowed to cost. If they revert from the hybrid system, they'll for sure scare away any of the potential interested, e.g Volkswagen, even if they've scribed of an F1 return as of now.

    • + 0
    • Dec 11 2015 - 14:08
  • khasmir

    Posts: 893

    One thing should be clear: Merc was involved from the very beginning in creating the specs of the current PU so they were always going to have an advantage. They were about a year ahead of anyone else.
    A good way to limit costs would be to standardize certain (ERS) components, that still leaves a lot of room do develop the ICE and turbo and such. Put out tenders for those standard components and push suppliers to improve year after year. Manufacturers can then also work with those suppliers to improve their road cars.

    • + 0
    • Dec 11 2015 - 18:59

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